What is physiotherapy?

This area of healthcare focuses on the assessment and treatment of people who are affected by disability, illness, or injury using such physical methods as manual therapy, exercise, and movement. A holistic approach is taken and a person’s individual circumstances and lifestyle are considered to maintain their well-being and health and to manage pain and prevent disease. If you are looking for a good physio then see here.

Physiotherapists are highly skilled and trained health professionals, with many of them specialising in helping individuals with such different conditions as:

Neurological – supports people who have conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), and rehabilitation after a stroke.

Respiratory – help people with such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, asthma, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Cardiovascular – help people rehabilitate following a heart attack or other incident.

Most people probably associate physiotherapy with muscles and bones – conditions like arthritis, sports injuries, back pain, or rehabilitation following a joint replacement. It is referred to as physiotherapy, which is the major focus of our article here.

According to Jack March, a rheumatology physiotherapist, there is practically no limit to the problems and conditions that can potentially benefit from using physiotherapy. He says that almost any loss of function, weakness, injury, or pain – including a twist, being unable to climb stairs, or reduced movement – can benefit from physiotherapy.

According to Jack March, a rheumatology physiotherapist, there is practically no limit to the problems and conditions that can potentially benefit from using physiotherapy. He says that almost any loss of function, weakness, injury, or pain – including a twist, being unable to climb stairs, or reduced movement – can benefit from physiotherapy.

Signs to watch for

Pain is often the first sign that you may benefit from visiting a physiotherapist. However, even really intense pain does not always mean there is a serious problem. Jack says that the severity of the actual pain often does not indicate how severe the injury is and it is fairly common to have high pain levels with minimal tissue damage.

No matter what the source of the pain is, in many cases, you can treat the pain at home using anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen or analgesics such as paracetamol. However, injuries or other types of problems that persist for several days, deteriorate, or reoccur may be a sign that it could be beneficial to see a physiotherapist.

This doesn’t always mean that treatment is necessary. However, having an assessment done can provide guidance on what needs to be done next or reassure you that you don’t have anything to worry about.

Jack says that symptoms like pins and needles, pain, or loss of range of motion, strength, or sensation often will resolve themselves in time. However, if they are impacting your daily tasks or last for over 14 days, then getting physiotherapy treatment can really help to speed the resolution process up or regain function as the symptoms are settling.

Jack also says that you may need to be assessed sooner if you are experiencing significantly reduce function in such movements as fine motor tasks, griping o bending, having a hard time walking, or feeling unstable while on your feet.

Some conditions or injuries need medical attention that is more urgent since it can be an indication that something more complex or serious is happening. For example, if you are experiencing numbness in your legs, pins and needles, changes in toilet habits, or back pain along with sexual dysfunction or loss of sensation in your genitals, then contact your GP as soon as you can. It is very important to be aware of what the red flags are for back pain that may need urgent medical help.

It is also important to get advice right away if you suddenly are having a hard time bearing weight, have very swollen o inflamed joins, have pain in multiple parts of your body, or have back pain that is radiating into both of your legs.